About a week ago Deadline reported that Warner Bros had acquired the rights to make a Dungeons & Dragons movie based on the board game Chainmail. The project was apparently moving along nicely with a script by David Leslie Johnson (Orphan, Wrath Of … Continue reading

Hasbro Attempts to Shut Down New ‘Dungeons & Dragons’ Film, Claims Rights Were “Falsely Represented” By Sweetpea Entertainment

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About a week ago Deadline reported that Warner Bros had acquired the rights to make a Dungeons & Dragons movie based on the board game Chainmail.

The project was apparently moving along nicely with a script by David Leslie Johnson (Orphan, Wrath Of The Titans).

The project, co-produced by Courtney Solomon (who directed Dungeons & Dragons in 2000) of Sweetpea Entertainment has now run into a legal battle.

Toy company Hasbro has filed a copyright and trademark infringement complaint against Sweetpea Entertainment, alleging that Solomon is “falsely representing” the D & D rights that Sweetpea has.

In response to Hasbro’s complaint, Solomon said, “This is nothing but shameless opportunism on the part of Hasbro, an effort to use the Court and the legal process in an attempt to delay the project. We intend to deal with them quickly and firmly and we are confident we will prevail – just as we did in the 1990’s, when the last legal challenge ended with a confirmation of Sweepea’s rights.”

Deadline believes that the toy company is upset because it had its own Dungeons & Dragons film in the works at Universal.

SOURCE: Deadline

Update from Gig Patta: Hasbro has an agreement with Universal Pictures for a big budget Dungeons & Dragons movie. In addition, the legal proceeding from Hasbro claimed that Sweetpea Entertainment lost its rights for failing to produce a movie every three to five years under the old agreement with TSR, Inc., the original company that made Dungeons & Dragons game. The lawsuit also claims that 2005′s “Dungeons & Dragons: Wrath of the Dragon God” and 2012′s “Dungeons & Dragons: The Book of Vile Darkness” did not count as movies and should be considered as long television shows–thus cancelling the old agreement and reverting the movie rights back to Hasbro.